How to install fonts on iPhone and iPad (iOS 14 supported)

With iOS 13 and iPadOS 13, Apple officially rendered users the ability to use custom fonts, at long last. The rollout supports custom fonts in – TrueType Font (.ttf), OpenType Font (.otf), and TrueType Collection (.ttc) formats. While the announcement brought great relief to designers, artists, and others within the creative field, the complications involved in installations may have deterred its practical usage. Well, no more of that! Scroll down to learn everything from how to install fonts on iPhone and iPad.

How do you install fonts on iPhone and iPad?

  1. Open the App Store app and tap on search and use ‘Fonts for iPhone’ phrase. Once you find a fonts app, tap on the GET button.Download Fonts in App Store in iOS 13 device
  2. If you have enabled Touch ID, Face ID, or Passcode on iTunes & App Store for app installation, Apple may ask you to register one of the three options before you can install the fonts. I have installed Fonteer on my iPhone; it’s a free app, you know!
  3. When the fonts app is installed, tap on OPEN. After giving necessary permissions to the app, tap on ‘+’ icon from the top left.Open Fonteer App and Tap on Plus Icon on iPhone
  4. Give ‘Collection Name’ and tap the OK button.Give Collection Name in Fonteer App
  5. Next, tap on ‘+’ icon from the top left. Two options will swipe up from the bottom: Google Fonts and Font Squirrel. You should choose ‘Google Fonts.’Tap on Plus and Select Google Fonts in Fonteer App
  6. Now, select the fonts you want to add. Note that you can choose multiple fonts; however, it is advisable to limit your selection to less than 10 fonts. After selecting the fonts, tap on ‘Add to collection.’ On your device screen, a pop-up. Tap on OK.Select the Fonts you wish to Install and Tap on Add to collection in iOS Fonteer App
  7. Then Go Back and tap on the ‘Install fonts’ option from the bottom.Tap on Install fonts in iOS Fonteer App
  8. You are now on the Safari app, where a dialog box asks you to allow this configuration profile. Tap on ‘Allow.’ When the profile is downloaded, a pop-up says ‘Profile Downloaded.’ Close this pop-up and exit the app.Tap on Allow to Download Profile on iPhone
  9. Now launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad → GeneralProfile.Tap on General and Profile in iOS 13 Settings
  10. Tap on Font and collection name (here, Fonteer – Fontabulous).Tap on Font Profile in iOS 13 Settings
  11. Tap on Install from the top right corner. Your device may ask you to enter the passcode; enter the code and tap on Install button again. Once Profile Installed, tap on Done.Install the Font Profile on iPhone or iPad

Now, you can use the downloaded fonts on the stock iPhone apps. For example, I will use Fonts for iPhone in the Mail app on my device.

Also Read: Best Font Apps for iPhone

How to use custom fonts on iPhone and iPad

  1. Open the Mail app on your iPhone and tap on the Compose button. If you have any mail in Draft, you can open it from the Draft folder.
  2. When you tap on the compose area of the Mail, you can see a side arrow on the right side above the keyboard, tap on it.Tap on Side Arrow icon in iPhone Keyboard
  3. Now, Tap on the Fonts icon and then tap on the Default Font option.Tap on Font Icon and Default Font in iPhone Keyboard
  4. Here, you can see all your downloaded and default fonts arranged in alphabetical order. Select your custom fonts and start typing the mail.Use Custom Fonts in iOS 13 on iPhone or iPad

Apart from the Mail app, you can also use the custom fonts in Apple apps like Pages, Numbers, and Keynote.

When you open any one of the three apps, you can find a brush icon; tap on this brush and start using your custom fonts.

Some fonts may not work on third-party apps you have downloaded on your iPhone. In this situation, you can download third-party keyboard apps – Fonts & Keyboard. Once you install the app, you can use custom fonts on any chat clients like WhatsApp, Messenger, Snapchat, and others.

How to install and use custom fonts on iPhone and iPad using Fonts & Keyboard

  1. Download Fonts & Keyboard app from App Store as it is clean and easy-to-use.
  2. Open the app and tap on ContinueSET UP NOW. This will take you to the Settings app.
  3. Or, Tap on GeneralKeyboardKeyboardsAdd New Keyboard…Tap on Keyboard then Keyboards and Add New Keyboard
  4. Scroll down and from under THIRD-PARTY KEYBOARDS, tap on Fonts.
  5. Tap on Fonts keyboard – Fonts and turn on the toggle for Allow Full AccessAllow.Tap Fonts then Fonts keyboard - Fonts and Allow Full Access
  6. Open a compatible app like iOS Notes, iMessage, Pages, Instagram, Twitter, etc. Start typing (or compose a post or tweet).
  7. Long-press on the globe icon and choose Fonts keyboard – Fonts. To change the font type, tap on F (see image) and choose the desired font.Press Globe Icon and Choose Fonts keyboard - Fonts
  8. Now, you can type in custom fonts.Select Desired Font on iPhone and Start Typing in New Font

Why I prefer third-party font and keyboard apps?

  • They have several free fonts. Plus, free and premium fonts are marked, which causes no confusion.
  • There are several keyboard themes.
  • They support GIF search.

FAQs about using custom fonts on iPhone and iPad

1. How can I get custom fonts on iPhone or iPad?

Your device must be updated to iOS 13 or later. Next, you must have compatible apps that support custom fonts. We have already mentioned a few names below.

2. Can I change the entire system-wide font on iOS like Android?

No, you can’t. On the iPhone and iPad, the installed custom fonts can be used only in supported apps like Notes, Pages, Numbers, iMessage, Instagram, Twitter, Word, Powerpoint, Autodesk Sketchbook, etc.

3. What is the use of custom fonts on the iPhone or iPad?

Whether you are making a presentation, preparing a word document, sending an Instagram DM, or working with text-photo editing, different fonts help you create a great first impression.

4. Can I use custom fonts without installing any app or profile?

Surprisingly, the answer is yes! But it is limited to a few apps like Mail, Pages, etc. If third-party apps (like Over) have an internal structure to use different fonts, you can use them without needing anything else.

5. Why do I see the message ‘No Fonts Installed’ even after installing an app?

Not all font apps will show up in settings. Only certain apps that support the compatible font libraries, when installed, will appear here. One example is Font Diner. After you download this app, you will see the fonts under the Settings app → General → Fonts. Here’s how.

  1. Download Font Diner for free from the App Store.
  2. Tap Activate next to the free Silverware Font Set. Next, Agree (if you do).
  3. Tap Install.Use Font Diner on iPhone to Install Custom Fonts
  4. Optional: Now, when you open the Settings app → General → Fonts, you will see several entries.In Settings app Tap on General Fonts to See All Installed Fonts
  5. Open an app that supports custom fonts, for example, Pages. Tap on the paintbrush iconFont. You will see the fonts that have been added by Font Diner.In Pages app Tap on Paintbrush Icon and Select Font to Type In It

6. How to delete third-party fonts?

You can delete the third-party app to get rid of fonts. You may also open the Settings app → General → Fonts → Edit → select the fonts you wish to delete and tap on Remove.How to Delete Third-party Fonts on iPhone

Enjoying the new fonts on your iPhone?

This is how you can install and use fonts on your iPhone and iPad. Some apps also allow you to use fonts by installing a unique profile. Due to security purposes, we have chosen to skip that. If interested, you can run a web search and find ample resources that explain this method.

Did you like the custom fonts feature? Share your views with us in the comment section below.

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I have been an Apple user for over seven years now. At iGeeksBlog, I love creating how-tos and troubleshooting guides that help people do more with their iPhone, iPad, Mac, AirPods, and Apple Watch. In my free time, I like to watch stand up comedy videos, tech documentaries, news debates, and political speeches.