How to Change Safari Default Search Engine on iPhone and iPad: Quick tip

Google is the default search engine for Safari when you set an iPhone or iPad. The search giant pays a significant amount to Apple to stay as Safari default search engine. Most people like using it, but some prefer Bing, DuckDuckGo, or Yahoo. Few people also have privacy issues and wish to use alternatives to Google and the services it provides. Whatever be your reason, if you want to change Safari default search engine on your iPhone, here are easy steps to do so.

How to Change Safari Default Search Engine on iPhone and iPad

Step #1. Open the Settings app on your iOS device.

Step #2. Scroll down and tap on Safari.

Tap on Safari in Settings App on iPhone

Step #3. Tap on Search Engine under the SEARCH section, and select the search engine you want.

Tap on Search Engine and Change Safari's Default Search Engine on iPhone

Currently, you can choose among Google (which is the default), Yahoo, Bing, and DuckDuckGo.

Step #4. Open Safari and type a search term in the address bar. You will see the results from the search engine you selected.

Search in Safari App on iPhone

Note: If Safari still uses the old search engine, quit Safari and try again, or restart your device and then try.

If anytime you wish to make Google the default search engine on iPhone, simply follow the above steps.

Signing off…

One thing to note is that after you follow this guide and switch to a different search engine, it works only for Safari. Third-party browsers like Chrome, Firefox, Brave, etc. are not affected by it. However, all these browsers let you change this inside their app settings.

Furthermore, this modification in Safari search engine settings does not change the search engine for Siri queries. Siri will still use Google for displaying search results on its screen. For images, Siri uses Bing. Interesting combination, right!

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