As we covered before, iOS 8 brings a few interesting feature-additions to the stock camera app. Besides revamping the photos app – with features like smart exposure settings in editing and advanced filters/search – Apple has introduced two new features in the camera: time-lapse and separate focus/exposure setting.

Before iOS 8, tapping long on a part of the image locked both the focus and exposure. (AE/AF Lock). While that’s handy, it’s not useful enough. You might want to focus on part of the image but have a different exposure setting. iOS 8 makes that possible on your iPhone/iPad.

How to Adjust Separate Focus and Exposure Setting on iPhone and Camera App in iOS 8

Here’s how to control focus and exposure settings on your iPhone/iPad on iOS 8:

  • Open the camera app
  • In the Photo mode (or Square), long-tap on the part of the image you want to focus on.
  • While keeping the finger pressed on the screen, swipe up or down the alter the exposure: up for brighter/larger exposure, and down for darker/lesser exposure.

How to Adjust The Exposure in iPhone Camera App on iOS 8

  • You’ll notice a brightness-slider on the right of the focus box which moves up/down depending on your swipe. (handy exposure level indicator but not very much useful.)
  • Stop the swiping when you reach the desired exposure level. You can then click the picture.
  • Fortunately, this is not the only place where you can edit the exposure/lightning. The Photos app comes with some new editing capabilities than before. One of them is the exposure/lightning setting which smartly lets you edit your photos for exposure.

Also Read: How to Shoot Time-lapse Videos on iPhone & iPad in iOS 8

To edit a photo:

  • Tap on the photo to be edited
  • You should see a smart adjustment icon (the one that looks like a brightness setting). Tap this.
  • You’ll now see two settings to configure: Light and Color. The Light is the one we’re aiming at.

How to Adjust The Exposure in iPhone and iPad Camera App on iOS 8

  • Tap on Light and it opens up a scroller that you can swipe to adjust the exposure/lighting on the photo. (Remember, you can undo the edits later).